Daily Scrum Antipatterns

Let’s have a look on a very central thing in Scrum in my eyes: the Daily Scrum. You can find a section in the Scrum Guide and many other places in the web. Living in the heart of every Sprint and every day of the Sprint, the Daily Scrum is the meeting for the Development Team to plan the next day. As you may read in the Scrum Guide, the Scrum Master and others are allowed, but they are not allowed to disturb the Daily Scrum. The Development Team decides how it wants to do the actual meeting. The Scrum Master only has to assure, that the meeting takes place, that the team is able to hold the 15 minutes timebox and that no outsider is disturbing. One common myth is, that everybody has to answer the holy three questions. That’s simply not true. The three questions are a good start for new teams to find a way to talk every day about the Sprint Goal. And that is the point where i want to start sharing my experiences and little stories.

Actual Antipatterns

The first thing i want to share is the “forced three questions”. Here the team lead forced the team members to answer the three questions. Without a doubt, the team had no right to improve or change the situation and was not empowered to organize its work as it wanted.

Another one i saw multiple times is the “i’ve done this and that”. The team members didn’t focused on the Sprint Goal. If you have a close look at the Scrum Guide, the three questions, there is always a “meet the Sprint Goal” at the end of them. So team members chatted about phone calls and refactoring a class and fixing this bug. But the Sprint Goal was not focused. And that’s a problem! The team should focus on the Sprint Goal and find a plan to reach it in the Daily Scrum. It is a inspect and adapt meeting, if the first plan got impediments in the way, the team has to adapt and change the plan.

Very close to that is the “hiding what you’re doing beside the Sprint Goal”. There one or multiple team members did things, which had nothing to do with the Sprint Goal and did not tell anybody. This is a violation of the Scrum Values focus, openness and maybe also respect. When someone of the team is not working together with the rest to reach the goals, it is unfocused and maybe also harming the morale of the remaining team and company.

Another thing what can be hidden are the mistakes. So the anti-pattern of the “hiding my mistakes” is harmful cause nobody will learn from them and they will be done again and again. This is a waste and should not be permitted. Whatever brings a team member to hide a mistake should be taken really seriously. If there is a broken culture, than the Scrum Master must have a look at it. It should be fixed as soon as possible to not end up in a situation where nobody is showing his errors and nobody can learn from them. Without being courageous we can’t adapt to the reality!

Talking about the culture i have to admit one pattern i saw multiple times is the “report meeting”. Here everybody is giving his or her report to the boss or the felt next higher tangible person. So if the boss is somehow once not there, than the Scrum Master is the recipient of the habitual report. There are two misconceptions. First is, that you have to tell what you’ve done and present your personal plan to someone. Second is, that the Scrum Master is higher than the team member. The latter shows a misunderstood Scrum interpretation. The Scrum Team is completely equal. The power is partitioned to have someone responsible for every important part in the development of complex products: the team is responsible for the how, the Product Owner for the what and the Scrum Master for the process. They are equal and together they build something great.

Quite similiar is the “chatty boss”. The boss is talking nearly all the time and even exceeding the timebox. He is giving everyone a task and looking for presenting himself. As you read through all the other patterns, there is nothing to add why this is a sign of not working Scrum.

The “forced metric” i saw and heard multiple times. For instance the team lead forced to fill the happiness metric. Without a doubt, if the team wants to fill a metric, that is clearly allowed. And on top it is a good sign for having some healthy habits. It shows, that the team may focus on side goals or true norths like better bug rates or better code quality. Being forced to fill a metric is a sign for a not so good understanding of theself-organising thingy.

Another hard thing i remember in one team was “the silence” or “the elephant in the room”. There were nearly no discussions or a hard atmosphere. Everybody was happy when the meeting was over. At least it felt like a big burden was gone after the Daily Scrum finally was done. That could’ve had several reasons. A new boss nobody liked or a cold conflict n the team were nobody wanted to get in struggle or some other hidden things. Here it is important to find the root cause and to fix it. Sometimes the Scrum Master can do this, sometimes he has to delegate it to HR.

Conclusion

Many misunderstandings of Scrum and the concepts in it can lead to Daily Scrums, which are not so valuable as they could be. Sometimes the Daily Scrum is a good indicator, that something deeper is broken. That could be the culture or the relationships. Than it is important to make this things transparent and to adapt to the reality.

What anti-patterns did you saw in your Daily Scrums? And how did you handled them? Which things helped and went something to the complete wrong direction? Just leave a comment and let me and the world know about your experiences!

Thanks for reading and have a good Daily Scrum :)!

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