Management 3.0: #3 Delegation Poker

A while ago i presented the first management 3.0 technique, the Kudo Cards and Box, in an earlier post and the Moving Motivators in the second post of this little series. Now i will write about the next technique: the Delegation Poker. Have you ever delegated to someone else? If so, you maybe have found yourself in a situation where you not knew how the status of the delegated job is or where you were not satisfied with the quality of the result. This two examples point out things which can happen, if you miss to make things clear. If you delegate, you should try to make the what, how and why as clear as crystal! Lets have a short look from the other side: have you ever had a boss who complained or even worse redone your work after you finished a job for him? There we have the unclear expectations again! The Delegation Poker tries to solve this problems and to make aware how much the person who receives the delegated jobs can and wants to handle them. This last point is reached by giving the chance of saying “i want you to do more in this particular case”.

As you see, delegation is more a scale than just a binary thing. Not only you or me, but little nuances like i will ask you or i will discuss with you. With this in mind we are able to find compromisses and negotiate where both of us see the job and the responsibility. Lets have a look at the actual cards we have in the Delegation Poker! There are the following:

  • tell
  • sell
  • consult
  • agree
  • advise
  • inquire
  • delegate

Now that we know the cards, we can have a look at the game itself. First we need a set of scenarios we want to decide who should have what responsibility. This can be easy little jobs or complex and complicated things like leading a whole department. We pick one after another of this scenarios and everybody selects secretly which card is nearest to his wished delegation level. All cards are revealed together, when every player decided for a card. If everybody has the same card, it is clear and decided, which level of delegation is chosen. If there are different cards, than it is obvious that there is a need to talk about the diverging ideas and wishes. After a short discussion there is the next round for the same topic, until there is a consensus. The results are noted on the delegation board: horizontal are the tasks to delegate (or not) and vertical are the seven cards. We make a mark on every line for which level of delegation we agreed on.

My experience

In the receiving position it was really fun and helpful to play Delegation Poker! It helped making clear to me which priorities we as a department have. Afterwards there was a motivation boost and i felt heard and valued. Even if there was not everything what i would liked to have in my direct influence. When i first wanted to play the Delegation Poker game it was a hard time. I chose an emotionally really charged situation. We had to put the cards aside to get out of the stressful area. Afterwards we found, that we can’t decide, if not also everybody is there to make all the decisions. So giving the Delegation Poker has some easily assessable conditions. Make sure there are no big emotional stress points open and that every decision maker is aware what you are going to do and even better: they are in the room and want to join too.

What are your experiences with delegating? Did you talked about it or was there just a “Hey, could you do this?”? Did you used the Delegation Poker and the Delegation Board? Just leave a comment and let the world and me know what you learned!

Thanks for reading and have fun delegating and being delegated!

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