Divide and Rule in Scrum – the roles

When thinking about Scrum what is coming in your mind first? The Scrum Master? The Sprints? The Product Backlog? Whatever it is, lets have a look on it from another angle: the good old divide et impera or defeat in detail! There are many historical persons who are attributed with it. We will not cover this part here, it could be a longer story :)!

With this blog post i am trying something new – at least a bit new for me: a series of shorter posts on a bigger topic. Let me know, if you like this more or the old way of sooo looong articles!

The roles

One part which i love about Scrum is the separation of concerns (sorry, deep in my heart i am still a software developer) of the roles. On one side we got the Product Owner. She, and only she, is responsible for the “what” is done and the “why” is it done. Business value and its maximization is her key responsibility.

Then there is the Team. Their business is the “how”. Nobody, not even the Scrum Master, can tell the Team how a specific thing has to be done. The Scrum Master has the right to intervene and ask, if there isn’t a better way to do things. But the Team has the final say!

Last but not least we got the Scrum Master. Her sphere of influence is the Scrum framework, its understanding and the living of it in the whole organization in the best way possible. With best possible here is ment, that the Team rises to high velocity and stays there. While we have many smaller parts in the servant leadership of this beautiful role, but in my eyes they fall completely under the correct understanding and living of Scrum and the high velocity of the Team.

Conclusion

Overall for me the Scrum Team is the best example of divide and rule! I love, that for every important part of the business there is somebody personal accountable. That gives Scrum the power it has! In the next blog posts you will read about the events, the artifacts and maybe the rules in Scrum corresponding to divide and rule.

What are your thoughts on Scrum in this point of view? Do you have something else you want to read about? Another perspective or another part of Scrum? Did you liked this blog post? Let me and the world know it and leave a comment!

Thanks for reading and sharing ­čÖé

Management 3.0: #2 Moving Motivators

In an earlier blog post i wrote about the Management 3.0 technique of the Kudo Cards and what i’ve learned using them.

Today we’re going to have a look at my experiences with the Moving Motivators, as you guessed it right, also a Management 3.0 technique. The key question the Moving Motivators try to solve is the following: what are the intrinsic motivations of a person and what does she win or lose if something changes? So it is a tool to become aware of the things the player thinks are most important to herself and make them transparent. That said, we can have a look at the motivators one can choose from. They are the following:

  • Curiosity
  • Honor
  • Acceptance
  • Mastery
  • Power
  • Freedom
  • Relatedness
  • Order
  • Goal
  • Status

Note, that the first letters form the word CHAMPFROGS, which reminds me of the great book Eat That Frog! – you don’t know it? My recommendation: read it, its full of entertaining small pieces of daily usable wisdom!

Lets have a look on the overall process: we have a facilitator, a player and the deck of motivator cards. The facilitator explains the steps and asks further questions to point out insecurities and make things clearer. First step is, that the player sorts the motivators in descending order of how important they are for her. Second step is to ask a question to have a closer look at. This can be as simple as “How will my life change, if i take the next step in my carreer and go to XYZ?”. With this question in mind you now have a look at each of the motivators. Will this motivator change to the good or to the bad? If its getting better with this decision, you move the motivator card upwards as much as you feel. If the motivator will be damped or you feel it will go down, you move the motivator card downwards as much as necessary. If you want to decide between several options, you can play the game multiple times, till you have a complete set of “How my life will change”-situations. You than can compare the options from another point of view.

When i played the game myself, i found some helpful things for myself: first i loved finding out what my motivators are. Being aware about what i need and want a bit more clearly made my expectations more realistic. Seeing that some things can be better, while other things go worse, gave me a deeper understanding of the complexity. When seeking for the next job it helped me and still helps me to figure out what i really want and where to go and where not.

When i played the game as facilitator i found, that this little game is a powerful tool for many people to find their way. On top it is a great structure to get in touch with the deeper feelings of one another. Whenever two people need to find out the real intention and motivation of one another it is a good starting point to have a look at the cards and open up. This is easier than with the direct question, because the cards and fun of a game is making the situation not looking to serious. But: you can handle really serious situations, don’t be fooled by the nice looking cards!

As a bonus i developed a nice little browser tool, with which you can play the Moving Motivators online. You can even save and load your results to have a look later on (have a look in the lower right corner for the icons ;)!

Did you ever heard from the Moving Motivators? What are your experiences with them? In which role did you played them? And what did you learned while plaing it? If you never heard of it: did this post animated you to try it out?

Thanks for reading and have a successful day!

Sushi programming

Today i want to share a programming technique with you. My former fellow developer Felix and i tried it and had real good experiences while using it. (Damn, its a long time we didn’t worked together and i miss it!)

We named it sushi programming. I will explain later how we came to this name, the differences to Katas and Pair Programming and where we found pros and cons. Let’s keep things short and dive into the sushi bar!

How to do it?

We have two phases in sushi programming:

  1. the performance and
  2. the discussion

Let’s dive into the performance

The base philosophy behind “Sushi Programming” is to watch, and ONLY watch, note things, which will be discussed later. So we have one developer who is writing code with his normal IDE in the normal way he does this. Lets call him the author.

The other role is the audience, at minimum one other developer. The audience is only watching the author. It is important, that the audience in no circumstance (only a nuclear war or the lunch time should disturb us ;)) talks to each other or the author. No questions like “How did you get your IDE to automagically create this whole file?” or “Why don’t you use this fancy key combination to commit your code?”. The audience just writes remarkable things down. This phase should durate between 15 and 45 minutes. With shorter phases you won’t find enough new good or bad habits, with longer the amount of things will decrease.

In the second phase, called discussion, the audience and the author walk through the notes of the audience. Here all good habits swap around the team and the bad ones get out of the author. Rule of thumb is, that all points should be formulated respectfull and without a personal judgement. So only ask “How did you did that magic trick?” or “Do you know, that you could generate the getters/setters?”. I think it is important to write about this rule, cause it will keep the drama out of the discussion. The aim of this technique is to spread the given knowledge as much as possible in the team and increase everyones work quality and speed.

Differences to other techniques

Pair Programming

In pair programming you are allowed to talk all the time. This gives the software developers a better understanding of each other and the solution they build. With suhi programming we are aiming only at the habits of each other. Therefore the silence in the first phase is installed.

Peer Reviews

Peer reviews are either with one guy or with multiple guys. So whenever a piece of code, a software or UI design or an architecture is watched by a group of people, we can call it a peer review. The aim is slightly different from sushi programming: in peer reviews we want to improve the code at all. We should not mind who wrote the code, we just want to see, if it fits our quality standards and our understanding.

Code Katas

Code Katas are a great wy to learn things as a group. We sit together and work through a rigid plan of steps without thinking too deep while doing. The aim is to get a new habit into our muscle memory. For instance it is perfect to get into the Test Driven Development circle, if you never before used it. Or a new framework into your brain. This said, the aim is clearly close to sushi programming: train the new things.

Why the crazy name “Sushi Programming”?

I’m not sure where i got this information from and if it is true: i heard, if you want to become a sushi cook, you have to spend a certain time as a dish washer and as a waiter. This phase around your aimed work should give you the respect for the other activities and let you soak in the spirit of a sushi restaurant, like how to treat the food and the guests. This should beware you of doing the biggest mistakes in the everyday worklife over and over again. You’re filled with best practices before you even ram your first knive in the first fish. Soaking the spirit, for the learning developers, and spreading the spirit, for the master developers is a healthy habit in my eyes.

Pros and cons

  • the flow of the author isn’t broke by discussions – a big plus to get more knowledge moving from one to another individual
  • the author and the audience find more hidden treasures (a.k.a. IDE shortcuts or bad habits) in the everyday routines of the other than by Pair Programming
  • the team members get a deeper understanding of the used techniques
  • the team members get kwowing each other better, because they see each other finding solutions (hopefully they reflect their own too and thereby know themself better)
  • the team members train discussing techniques and routines without hurting personal feelings, which will be good for the team spirit
  • after a time only the knowledge of the team is spreaded, there is a “we don’t learn anthing new” if you do it too often, without developers from the outside of the team

Conclusion

For me it was a really useful habit to sometimes sushi program. Our team knowledge went up fast and it helped me and the others! So my recommendation is: try it yourself and have fun!

Did you liked the article or the idea? Do you feel the urge to propose a better name? Do you know, if it is part of becoming a suhsi cook to be dish washer and waiter first? Did you tried it yourself with some colleagues? What were your experiences? Than please leave a comment!

Thanks for reading and sharing!

Management 3.0: #1 Kudo Cards

You may have heard about the Management 3.0 system. It is a set of games, tools and practices, which helps managing oneself and organisations. In this little series i am explaining one by one some of these parts of the system and share my experiences with them. Lets dive right into the first part: the Kudo Cards!

Kudo Cards & Kudo Box

The Kudo Cards are a set of cards (you guessed it right ;)). On those cards some kind of compliment sentences are started and there are some empty lines to fill. Example compliments are “Well done …” or “Great job …”. Thats it. Your job is now to think of your colleagues and pick an event or quality which you really like and fill the empty space with your own words. Afterwards you can either hand it over directly or anonymously. For the anonymous way there is a Kudo Box. It is like a mailbox, where you can throw in your mail and then it is up to your organisation how to ritualise the handover. In our company we do it as one point to hand out the Kudo Card to the adressee. But he is free to only read it alone or to say thanks how he want.

Our Kudo Box with the great Kudo 2.0 QR Code Video Kudo Card.

My experience

When i introduced the Kudo Cards, i was just thinking, that they are a great idea. As i am, i handed my first set directly to the recipients and did not think about what they could think about it. So i didn’t installed a Kudo Box or a ritual, because in my eyes it was like positive things could be told face to face. Damn was i wrong. As a direct reaction to my announcement three guys came to me and asked why there is no Kudo Box. Asking them why they want one, brought up, that they are shy and don’t want to hand them directly. So our Kudo Box was born and the ritual was introduced, which made these shy ones happy.

To accelerate the usage of these ideas i started writing cards for the ones who deserved it before the company retrospective. Everyone who got one card was happy and proud in this moment. It was a great experience to see, what a little compliment in front of everybody else can do. Some where infected by the idea and also wrote compliments for others too. They mostly gave them directly or brought them to the desk when the recipient wasn’t there. One great idea was a “Kudo Card 2.0” with a QR code. Behind the QR code was a link to a YouTube video with an old german ad celebrity telling you what a marvelous colleague you are. At the moment the Kudo Cards are somehow in a hibernation. Since more than two months there is no card in our box. But i don’t stop to remind my colleagues and hold up the ritual of opening the Kudo Box while the company retrsopective.some gave the Kudo Cards directly to each other some over the Kudo Box

Conclusion

First of all i really love the Kudo Cards. Having a little positive wall near my desk keeps up my moral and helps over heavy situations! This experiment helped me learning things too! First a real obvious one: not everybody is as extrovert as me with compliments and feedback. Second they last much longer than the short term experience of a spoken compliment. Don’t get me right, if there’s something working well your rule of thumb should be to speak it out loud as fast as you can. Last but not least there is a big influence of just having this instrument in your company, organisation or tribe towards a positive way of thinking. Only some cards make a difference for those who get them. They walk around with a better mood for a while and give this happiness into a virtuos circle.

I absolutely recommend Kudo Cards for you! ­čÖé

Do you have any experiences or want to say anything about this topic? Just leave a comment, thanks for reading!

Agile Conferences/Camps/…

This is a list of all conferences, camps, gatherings and come-togethers i stumbled upon over the years. It is not complete in any way and is only here for finding them later and (hopefully) for your inspiration!

You see something is missing or want to share some cool stuff? Just leave a comment or direct mail me!